The AHA/ASA Early Career Voice provides a 365-day view of the impact AHA science has on the daily practice and research of early career cardiovascular and stroke professionals. Topics range from implementing new science into patient treatment and research, securing research funding and travel awards, the process of submitting science, and much more.

Statements or opinions expressed on the AHA|ASA Early Career Voice reflect the views of the contributor, and do not reflect the official views of the AHA|ASA, unless otherwise noted.

Latest Posts

  • International Stroke Conference 2017
    I have attended the International Stroke Conference (ISC) every year since my third year of residency in 2013. It is by far the most educational and most fun conference for me as a stroke neurologist. This is the premiere conference for stroke and most of the groundbreaking trials are presented here. I remember the ISC 2015 in Nashville where several of ... more...
  • Cardiovascular Research and Care in the Era of Big Data
    Ten years ago, I made a decision that had a profound and lasting impact on my career. I decided to take time off, in the midst of grad school, and learn introductory computer programming. This was already several years after the initial draft sequence of the human genome had been released, and big data was starting to permeate virtually every research ... more...
  • Wake-up Strokes
    Strokes continue to be the leading cause of long term disability. One of the primary reasons for this is a short time window acutely where patients are eligible for IV thrombolysis. Endovascular intervention increases the time window. Large proportions of patients with stroke do not make it to the hospital within this treatment window. When ... more...
  • Community Engagement
    As a Cardiologist in-training—and concerned physician, in general—I think it’s a good idea to stop every once in a while, to consider some of the ways we might engage our communities through our careers. After all, the walls of a hospital or clinic certainly aren’t the bounds of the care we provide. In many regards, our mission only starts there!   Being ... more...
  • Lead-Based Masses: An Iatrogenic Challenge No One Saw Coming!
    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have undergone tremendous changes over the years. Since the days of Hyman, they have undergone transformation from backups in emergencies to dependable workmen. In keeping with the same transformation, an entirely new treatment modality (cardiac resynchronization devices) emerged. Expected ... more...

Most Recent Comments


Great article Mark Kaeppler‍! Thank you.
 
We have all heard inspirational stories about physicians who have undergone personal trysts with diseases, either first hand or in a family member, during the formative years, and grew to be leaders dedicated to disease management. However, not all such people become physicians.
Thanks
http://proinp.com/
I think there are two great points in Phil’s post: 1) the funding levels at NIH are exceedingly low, and 2) there are numerous mechanisms to bridge or promote funding of early stage investigators. I also agree that young investigators do need to take advantage of many of the mechanisms that are in place, and need to start planning for most of these several YE...
I agree completely. My impression was that one goal of reducing the number of oral presentations was to reduce concomitant oral programming, so hopefully: 1) people who would have had/attended oral presentations will attend posters, and 2) people who have posters will not miss out on related oral sessions. Looking forward to see how well this works at S...