The AHA/ASA Early Career Voice provides a 365-day view of the impact AHA science has on the daily practice and research of early career cardiovascular and stroke professionals. Topics range from implementing new science into patient treatment and research, securing research funding and travel awards, the process of submitting science, and much more.

Statements or opinions expressed on the AHA|ASA Early Career Voice reflect the views of the contributor, and do not reflect the official views of the AHA|ASA, unless otherwise noted.

Latest Posts

  • Silent Strokes
    You go to your doctor to be evaluated for mild forgetfulness. These memory symptoms are minimal and are not interfering with daily functioning. Your family doctor orders a brain MRI “just to make sure everything is okay”. Later on, you get a call from your family doctor telling you that the MRI brain shows some “silent strokes”. Now you’re being referred ... more...
  • American Heart Association Annual Scientific Sessions 2016: Nurturing Lifelong Mentoring Relationships
    As we evolve into sub-specialized cardiologists, focusing on our chosen cardiovascular sub-specialty, we gradually get distanced from the broader cardiovascular specialty meetings, gravitating more toward our sub-specialty annual Scientific Sessions in interventional cardiology, electrophysiology, heart failure and cardiovascular ... more...
  • The Holidays & Counseling Patients on Physical Activity
    We’re officially inside the 2016 holiday season! And—however you’re bound to celebrate—I’d bet your tradition relies heavily on eating delicious food… and likely a more than ample quantity of it.   Estimates vary widely in how much weight we gain each year during the holidays. Review of a few popular websites lends support to a few general points: 1. ... more...
  • A Career in Medicine is Needed to Attend! Says Who?
    Medical conferences have become hubbub of displaying the latest in medical technology and knowhow. They give platforms for representing the future and a meeting place for those who were the chief architects for it. Pharmaceutical companies have always been an integral part of this presentation. One can argue about the ethics of it endlessly (read ... more...
  • A Lipid-Laden Conference
    Nothing paired with the beignets and po’ boys of New Orleans as well as did the many important lipid trials and atherosclerosis oriented science featured at this year’s Scientific Sessions.   HOPE-3 – The Effect of Blood Pressure and Cholesterol on Lowering Cognition presented by Jackie Bosch.   As part of the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation-3 ... more...
  • First Time at Scientific Sessions – My Impressions
    This was my first time at scientific sessions. As a stroke neurologist, it’s not one of the conferences on my calendar but I am happy I got to attend it this year. It’s heavily geared towards cardiology with some component of stroke and peripheral vascular disease. I got exposed to a lot of cutting edge cardiology research and met a lot of bright ... more...
  • What Going to AHA 2016 Has Meant to Me
    In a recent blogpost, I’d mentioned that this was my first time attending the annual American Heart Association conference. I had a lot of reasons for wanting to go and—although I wasn’t quite sure what to expect—the conference exceeded my expectations.   Here are my personal highlights: Exposure It was amazing (and somewhat overwhelming) to be able ... more...
  • PIONEER AF-PCI: Impressions from Duane Pinto, MD, MPH from AHA 2016 Scientific Sessions, New Orleans, LA
    The American Heart Association (AHA) Annual Scientific Sessions 2016 in New Orleans showcased novel, cutting-edge science that will impact patient care and move the field of scientific discovery and innovation forward. For the clinical cardiologists, interventionalists and electrophysiologists that take care of patients with atrial ... more...
  • A Scientific Hit Parade In New Orleans
    The 2016 AHA Scientific Sessions couldn’t have come at a better time. I congratulate the countless administrators, clinicians, scientists, students, abstract reviewers and technical staff that pulled this off big league (or is that bigly?). Although for some folks it felt a little early to venture into red-state territory, but alas New Orleans is ... more...
  • My Inspiration
    This was my first time attending Scientific Sessions in New Orleans. It was a great experience from spending time in the Technology Hall with all the exhibits, simulations and posters. I also got to attend several sessions at the conference. The session that I enjoyed the most was the opening session specially when Dr. Houser, President of AHA/ASA ... more...
  • An Example Of The Application Of Big Data From AHA 2016
    Among a variety of personal and professional goals I’d set in coming to my first American Heart Association conference, I wanted to gain an appreciation for what’s “in the pipeline” that will impact how I care for patients with cardiovascular diseases.   So much of what we do in Medicine relies on the acquisition of good, reliable data. We rely on it and so ... more...
  • Poster Presentation: Pocket Dynamo Or A Poor Relative?
    Presenting a poster at a major conference is an integral part of our education system. If you are lucky, you have the aptitude to make a poster and be able to organize it in a manner that makes complete sense. If not, it could be akin to painting a house; a virtual nightmare of color and shade selection and for a generation that did not have Twitter to help ... more...
  • First Impressions of AHA Scientific Sessions in the Eyes of a Stroke Neurologist
    The 2016 AHA Scientific Sessions, the premiere venue for cardiovascular and stroke science, has finally begun. As a first-time attendee of the AHA sessions, I’m impressed by the diversity of learning opportunities available to me. Even if I’m not a cardiovascular specialist, I can still glean useful knowledge that helps me with my daily clinical ... more...
  • Physicians’ Opinion: Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t
    In a patient interview, the most common question asked after the discussion of options is always ‘what would you do?’ or its multiple variants. This is usually a question one can sidestep with some degree of grace or fall into it headlong without any qualms.   I have had discussions lasting hours, with colleagues on the appropriate answer to this ... more...
  • My Picks For Interventionalists/Structuralists Attending AHA 2016
    The Fall foliage is at its peak, and the mood is getting festive as we approach Thanksgiving later this month. For cardiologists, the Fall is a busy time of the year with various scientific sessions lined up one after the other, right before the Holiday fervor begins to garner more traction. We are just a week away from the results of the US Presidential ... more...
  • Charlie Hotel Foxtrot: New Maps For Complex Diseases
    On a course from Seattle to San Diego, an airline pilot at 32,000 feet mean sea level essentially considers California to exist only in two parts – Oakland Center and Los Angeles Center - as split up by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) into northern and southern sectors respectively (see map). At that altitude the grape vines of Napa Valley and ... more...
  • Life After Stroke: Improving Quality Of Life For Stroke Survivors
    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Three out of four stroke victims experience stroke for the first time. Whether it’s a relatively minor, or major stroke with severe neurologic deficits, the transition to outpatient care and independent living after stroke can be daunting. Stroke survivors encounter a myriad ... more...
  • The Advent Of Endovascular Intervention In Stroke
    Couple of weeks ago, I saw two patients in clinic for hospital discharge follow-up. Both were young and both had a recent stroke. The first patient was a 37-year-old man with valvular heart disease requiring anticoagulation with Coumadin. He presented with a severe right MCA stroke and was found to have a right M1 occlusion. His INR was sub therapeutic ... more...
  • Cardiovascular Disease In Low Socioeconomic Populations
    Cardiovascular disease is the number 1 cause of death worldwide. Which means more people die each year from cardiovascular disease than from any other cause. Unfortunately, more than three quarters of all cardiovascular deaths occur in low and middle income families.   In these socio-economic populations a lack of proper health education is ... more...
  • Gaining Access
    In having this opportunity to be an "Early Career" blogger through the AHA, I lay claim to being on the very early end of the career spectrum. I started my Cardiology Fellowship training on July 1, 2016—along with every Fellow in every specialty across the nation.   I've been thrilled to be able to finally state that, yes, I'm a Cardiologist, after years of ... more...

Most Recent Comments

I think there are two great points in Phil’s post: 1) the funding levels at NIH are exceedingly low, and 2) there are numerous mechanisms to bridge or promote funding of early stage investigators. I also agree that young investigators do need to take advantage of many of the mechanisms that are in place, and need to start planning for most of these several YE...
I agree completely. My impression was that one goal of reducing the number of oral presentations was to reduce concomitant oral programming, so hopefully: 1) people who would have had/attended oral presentations will attend posters, and 2) people who have posters will not miss out on related oral sessions. Looking forward to see how well this works at S...
Interesting concept. But I think it will only be successful if the poster session is scheduled when there is no concurrent oral session that is of similar research interest (what's that...Cores 2 and 7?). If the scheduling is at the same time, many of the poster presenters will also miss out on some great oral sessions. Similarly, many of the presenters (a...
Thanks for the post. The program committee is very excited about these poster changes. We do want to increase interaction and networking, the very things that make AHA Scientific Sessions such a great place to present our science. Try it out this year and continue to send us your comments! We especially hope people like the Poster Professor concept.